About
Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

Resources

Ability


Child Development

NurtureShock: New Thinking About Children by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman

Class & Socio-Economic Status

Educated: A Memoir by Tara Westover

Culture & Heritage

Third Culture Kids: Growing Up Among Worlds by David C. Pollock, Ruth E. Reken, and Michael V. Pollock

Gender


Identity


Immigrant & Refugee Experiences

Invasive Species by Marwa Helal

Inclusion

LGBTQ+


Microaggressions & Bias

Blind Spot: Hidden Biases of Good People by Mahzarin R. Banaji and Anthony G. Greenwald
Recognizing Microaggressions by Nadra Nittle
Citizen: An American Lyric by Claudia Rankine

Politics


Religion


Race

Critical Race Theory: An Introduction by Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic

Robinson’s Bookshelf

Robinson’s Bookshelf features recommendations on various DEI topics from Jason Robinson, Head of School.

By David Blight

In studying the period of Reconstruction after the Civil War, Race and Reunion identifies a pattern of thought that impeded racial progress at the time and still does so today. We have a tendency to submerge and avoid difficult conversations about race because of concerns that doing so will be divisive and undermine unity. Advocates of racial justice, both during Reconstruction and today, value unity as well, but see unity as something we can only achieve — in a true and lasting sense — if we work “through” racial issues, rather than avoiding them. As Dr. King said: “True peace is not the absence of tension but the presence of justice.”
Located in Washington D.C.,  St. Albans School is a private, all boys day and boarding school. For more than a century, St. Albans has offered a distinctive educational experience for young men in grades 4 through 12. While our students reach exceptional academic goals and exhibit first-rate athletic and artistic achievements, as an Episcopal school we place equal emphasis upon moral and spiritual education.